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1. Playing mother nature – natural “local” beauty
 
To meet consumer demand for pure and efficacious products, the industry’s approach to natural and sustainable ingredients will be adapted. With the “back to basics” trend only growing in popularity as people choose to buy locally-sourced and produced products, the safety, source and certifications of products are becoming more important than ever before.
 
Brands will start to give mother nature a helping hand by becoming more local, in terms of ingredient sources, which will also strengthen the idea of local pride, as well as encompassing developments in biotechnology.
 
In the future, the possibility for safe, allergen-free, pure and efficacious ingredients through science could replace the harvesting of natural ingredients, helping climatic changes around the world.
 
Vivienne Rudd, director of global innovation and insight, beauty & personal care at Mintel, said: “In the coming year and beyond, the beauty industry will navigate the conflicting demands of the ‘naturals-hungry’ consumer with shrinking natural resources and it will be through harnessing biotech advantages that a new generation of enhanced natural products is created." 
 
2. My beauty, my rules – beauty defined on the consumer’s terms
 
The experts at Mintel say the perception of beauty will be reset in 2018, with brand’s shifting away from targeting customers on demographics/labels and focusing much more on behaviour instead – “personalisation is set to reach new heights as brands strive to embrace total inclusivity,” adds Rudd.
 
Beauty consumers are individual and as such, want products that fit their personal routines and sensitivities – not based on their age, gender or body type. Researchers predict that this evolution will see the removal of labels based on these characteristics, with options for customisable beauty.
 
For example, Rhianna’s Fenty Beauty global make-up line which has products for all skin types and tones, including those traditionally hard to match, creating universal shades.
 
3. Campaign capital – brands need personality
 
Being a big brand name will no longer be enough as consumers turn to those businesses that have campaigns that align with their own beliefs and values.
 
Brands now need to impress customers with a human-like personality that’s relatable, personable and sincere, especially as Mintel’s research revealed that shoppers prefer brands that earn honest money. 
 
“When it comes to ethics, it will be imperative for brands to have a personality that is genuine and a viewpoint that clearly communicates their positioning,” says Rudd.
 
For 2018 and beyond, experts predict there will be a big focus by brands on funding educational projects instead of just giving money to charity, especially as environmental and ethical issues are at the forefront for Millennials and Generation Z.
 
4. Private eye – customisation in the shopping experience
 
Digital technology is set to make shopping more personal in 2018, influencing product purchases and making it easier for time-pressed consumers who need a more intuitive shopping experience.
 
This tech will determine customers’ product preferences by interpreting facial expressions and eye movements – both in store and online. In the future, experts believe this use of biometric data will go beyond eye tracking, using heart rate, body language and speech for a more complete assessment of consumer preference.
 
“Developments in biometric monitoring will see brands drive unprecedented customisation of the shopping experience,” adds Rudd.
 

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